liz. 22. elementary, revenge, htgawm, oitnb, sleepy hollow, art, photography; girl groups are everything
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"Smug Viola Davis was a sight to behold. I love the shot of all her students cowering and running from the mob, and she just struts right through with one of the smuggest faces I’ve ever seen. It was beautiful." (x)

(Source: chriscolfer)

If someone were to die at the age of 63 after a lifelong battle with MS or Sickle Cell, we’d all say they were a “fighter” or an “inspiration.” But when someone dies after a lifelong battle with severe mental illness and drug addiction, we say it was a tragedy and tell everyone “don’t be like him, please seek help.” That’s bullshit. Robin Williams sought help his entire life. He saw a psychiatrist. He quit drinking. He went to rehab. He did this for decades. That’s HOW he made it to 63. For some people, 63 is a fucking miracle. I know several people who didn’t make it past 23 and I’d do anything to have 40 more years with them.

anonymous reader on The Dish

One of the more helpful and insightful things I’ve seen about depression/suicide in the last couple of days.

(via mysweetetc)

I know this is late but I was in the hospital and dealing with my own suicidality when Robin Williams died. One of the hardest things for me to deal with about my chronic mental health issues (besides my symptoms) is that if I finally die because of them, almost nobody will remember me for my fight. No one will remember me for somehow managing to live past 16; 20; 22; 25. Instead I’ll be remembered for failing to live longer than I did. I can’t think of any other chronic high-fatality illness in which people memorialize your death as a failure instead of a life-long struggle.

(via riotrite)

(via chokeonthefuckery)

priceofliberty:

3D Printed Spine Saves 12 Year Old Boy in China

Doctors at China’s Peking University Third Hospital have successfully removed a cancerous vertebra from a 12-year old boy and replaced it with a 3D printed implant in a first such procedure worldwide, Forbes reports.
“This is the first use of a 3D-printed vertebra as an implant for orthopedic spine surgery in the world,” said Dr. Liu Zhongjun, director of the Orthopedics Department at the hospital, as quoted by the CBS News.
The boy, referred to as Minghao, was diagnosed with cancer following a football accident. The tumor was located on the second vertebra in his neck. He is reported to be in good condition following a five-hour surgery and is expected to recover quickly.

Read More

priceofliberty:

3D Printed Spine Saves 12 Year Old Boy in China

Doctors at China’s Peking University Third Hospital have successfully removed a cancerous vertebra from a 12-year old boy and replaced it with a 3D printed implant in a first such procedure worldwide, Forbes reports.

“This is the first use of a 3D-printed vertebra as an implant for orthopedic spine surgery in the world,” said Dr. Liu Zhongjun, director of the Orthopedics Department at the hospital, as quoted by the CBS News.

The boy, referred to as Minghao, was diagnosed with cancer following a football accident. The tumor was located on the second vertebra in his neck. He is reported to be in good condition following a five-hour surgery and is expected to recover quickly.

Read More

(via wretchedoftheearth)

sentinalsofseveredflesh:

How do people hate this show

(Source: burgertv, via 40h4error)

The fact that colonialism is so central to science-fiction, and that science-fiction is so central to our own pop culture, suggests that the colonial experience remains more tightly bound up with our political life and public culture than we sometimes like to think. Sci-fi, then, doesn’t just demonstrate future possibilities, but future limits—the extent to which dreams of what we’ll do remain captive to the things we’ve already done.
shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

shrooomieee:

Neither land nor women are territories of conquest

(Source: mal-educadx, via sociolab)

asylum-art:

Sungseok Ahn’s series entitled “Historic Present”

South Korean artist Sungseok Ahn’s series entitled “Historic Present” questions the memory of past from the fast changing scenery of today. By overlapping a historical location with an old image of that exact place, he questions the way we treat our history and explores the dynamics between space and time at the same time.

(via superarchitects)